Our Farmers

Meet the farmers that make it possible for you to make and enjoy food that is SIMPLi good! 

How do we support these communities?

  • Pay 20% above market price
  • We are transiting the fields from conventional to USDA Organic and purchase the transitional organic harvests in between.
  • We go to the farmer. This way, families don’t have to travel up to 3 hours to the closest town on feet or by animals to exchange their goods.

Greece

Greece

Greece

In a world of rapid change it is imperative to rethink outdated processes to be more efficient and effective. Our overall approach to sourcing ingredients is fundamentally shifting the benefitting stakeholders from US-domicile company profits to farmers, the environment and you.

Paraguay 

Paraguay known as "the heart of South America", is environmentally friendly driven by their dependency on hydro-energy. Although almost a third of their exports are soybeans, they are known to have great agricultural products like corn and chia seeds!

Simpli works with the San Pedro community to source our chia seeds directly from the source.

San Pedro, Paraguay

Product: Chia Seeds

Location: Central Paraguay

Start Date: 2019

San Pedro, Paraguay

Product: Chia Seeds

Location: Central Paraguay

Start Date: 2019

With typical humid and rainy weather, San Pedro lies between the Jejuí Guazú and Paraguay rivers. Rivers play an extremely important role in the economic life of San Pedro, where almost a third of their exports are soybeans. The people of San Pedro enjoy some of the more fertile parts of Paraguay and have diversified agricultural production to achieve better standards of living. The region is self-sufficient in growing soybeans, corn, wheat, rice, and chia seeds. While some farmers successfully joined farm cooperatives to increase leverage for trading, Simpli ensures we elevate the agricultural practices of the farming community and lower farmer costs by partnering with the local municipal and farming community.

    Peru

    Peru provides about half of the world's supply of quinoa. From the rolling hills near the Andes to the tropical Amazonian rainforests, Peru's agricultural communities harvest nutrient-rich and healthy products.

    Simpli works with two communities to source our quinoa directly from the Andes Mountains.

    Puno, Peru

    Product: Quinoa

    Location: Southern Peru

    Start Date: 2019

    These fields apply sustainable, organic, and regenerative practices by rotating the fields with purple corn, to complement the soil with phosphorus, and with alfalfa, to provide nitrogen to the soil. These families didn’t have any means or general access to sell their products to international markets and benefit from the higher profit that the export market can deliver. Some local brokers take advantage of communities like Juliaca for their high-quality products at a low market cost due to the community’s lack of infrastructure to collect quinoa, transport to local warehouses, and process it into export packaging. We have partnered with the local municipal and farming community of Juliaca to provide these infrastructure tools at no cost and no commitment. We believe by elevating the agricultural practices of farming communities, the quinoa industry benefits from these practices and fraudulent food activity is reduced; the communities can be more competitive in the export market and the farmers realize a better lifestyle.

    Ayacucho, Peru

    Product: Quinoa

    Location: Southern-Central Peru

    Start Date: 2019

    The quinoa plant thrives in the high altitudes of the Andes Mountains, where most farmers live and farm on small plots of land. These farmers have increasingly joined different quinoa producers' associations to counteract the lack of bargaining power against international markets. We have partnered with the local municipal and farming community to provide the infrastructure tools at no cost and no commitment. We believe by simplifying the agricultural practices of farming communities, the quinoa industry benefits from these practices and fraudulent food activity is reduced; the communities can be more competitive in the export market and the farmers realize a better lifestyle.